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20121129
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repeated their openness to being willing to raise taxes, which is something that is violated republican orthodoxy. here is jay carney just a few minutes ago in reaction to those comments. >> some of the comments you mentioned are welcome. and they represent what we hope is a difference in tone and approach to these problems and a recognition that a balanced approach to deficit reduction is the right approach. it's the one most beneficial for our economy. >> reporter: the president's trying to take advantage of that different tone. he talked to speaker boehner over the weekend by telephone. and today you've had two business leaders, john engler, tom donahue, in to meet with senior white house officials. they're trying to keep this going. aides on capitol hill tell me no substantive progress in negotiations just yet. they're just now getting back to work after thanksgiving. >> how does that make you feel about the market? does it make you feel like they have more kum-bi-ya going on in washington, d.c.? does it make you more willing to invest? >> i'll tell you what. i saw spielberg's "linc
, that what moved up nicely is going to be the piggy bank that gets cracked first before the tax man comes based on the unknowns of the fiscal cliff. >> would you buy gold here, michael? >> no, no. i'm going wait for it to wash out a little more. then i'm going add to my positions. i have a -- >> you don't weigh gold outright. >> you have to own some gold. qe-4 is coming. no doubt about it. they're already doing $40 billion per month. it's going to be $85 billion of unsterilized counterfeiting per month starting january 1. how do you abandon gold in that premise? >> that's exactly right. we're playing it a little bit differently. we like some of the gold-related companies. >> the miners have gotten beaten up. they got beat up much worse than the actual metals. >> there's cost and exploration you have to factor in. >> are those your best ideas? >> no, actually. i think you can still -- i'm half if cash. i think you can look for areas to enter in o short position on lockheed martin. >> defense stocks because of the fiscal cliff. >> yes, but once that gets solved, i think you have a huge rall
have on the tax treatment of dividends out there? you get all these companies imposing early dividends, special dividends to try and slip it in before the end of the year. yet, you're still buying high yield right now. >> that's right. the reason i'm not worried is the high yield side of our strategy is preferreds, high yield bonds, mortgage-backed securities. those are areas that don't have the preferential treatment on the income stream right now. it does include the dividends on the common stocks that have the qualified dividend preferable tax treatment. the areas we're investing in high yield, in fact, if the taxes on dividend paying stocks goes up on a relative basis, they look even more attractive on a comparable basis. >> steven, what are you guys doing on the floor right now? there are an awful lot of guys who have been skeptical on the rallies recently. are you among them? >> i think long-term david is right. but right now, there's going to be a lot of bumps in the road. you can play both sides. where was the s&p resistant today? it was resistant at 1407 three times. that was
taxes, but if you look at the cac, for example, they've had a huge week. france was downgraded and did lose their aaa, at least from the moody's vantage point. never before has the rally made 16 1/2% look so cheap, but that last one is an interesting story. you know, one of the things we were supposed to be potentially on this fix and bail was let's try to retire some of that paper, but investors are smart. this is the problem with these programs. they purchased it, and they're probably made the price too expensive. that looks like that's off the table as well. >> i know we have quinn back, so let me pose this question to. a lot of the rally we have seen this week is built on hope as opposed to hard facts. do you feel between now and the end of the year is that the market might react badly to any bad news? >> i think so. i think we have seen a rally that just came from an oversold, you know, very, very sharp decline. we had the qe-3 sell-off, the sell-off after the election. we've gotten half of that back. s? an opportunity, if you were freaking out last week, going my gosh, i don't wa
there. >> does that change if dividend taxes go much higher as it relates to the fiscal cliff? does the reason to own dividend payers go away? >> i think there will be a repricing of some of that risk, frankly. a lot of it depends on the tone coming out of d.c. there's not going to be a grand bargain this year. i think it's the tone and the message that we'll hear in the next couple weeks. >> meantime michelle, another area you cover carefully, the debt crisis in europe and whether or not greek gets this next trun j. >> headline, greece still needs money. they still haven't gotten it. the hope is they may get it on monday. that could be a potential destabilizing situation, but the bottom line is the only people they really owe the money to right now is the ecb. it's probably going get washed through. it's going to be a lot of drama, but you haven't seen the u.s. markets trade so much on it. we'd have to see them leaving the euro to get an impact. i'm not sure it would be that big an impact. >> you agree, rick santelli? >> i think greece is the canary in the coal mine with regard to
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5